toy soldiers

Could Your Collection Be Worth A Fortune?

People love to collect things. It seems to be a part of human nature, and many of us love to have a small collection of interesting objects. It could be anything from stamps to postcards to action figures… Whatever catches your eye really. But for most of us, our collections are little more than something to do. Something of interest. And if we do decide to include them in our will, it is not usually for the beneficiaries to gain any monetary value from them.

But this is not always the case.

Bob Postal collected toy soldiers. His collection spanned 30 years, and he had more than 10,000 when he died in September 2015.

Toy soldier collection worth a fortune 300x225 Could Your Collection Be Worth A Fortune?

He left the collection to his wife, Carole, who, although fond of the items because they had been Bob’s, and because they had always been a part of their life together, did not know what to do with them. It is likely that she would simply have left them in their boxes and cabinets if a friend had not phoned her up to tell her about a news progamme she had just seen.

The programme had been called ‘Strange Inheritance’, and it was all about a man who left a collection of toy soldiers, much like Bob Postal’s, to his family. The family wanted to sell them which, as it turned out, would be a good idea because they were worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Carole Postal wrote to the programme herself to tell them about her collection, and she was featured on an episode entitled ‘Toy Soldier Story 2’. She told viewers that when she and Bob had first got married he had insisted that they buy an apartment with two bedrooms rather than the one they needed. When Carole asked why, Bob told her about his toy soldier collection. Carole said she never minded as long as ‘the guys’ (as Bob called them) remained in the soldier room.

Postal’s collection has been valued at over $300,000, and experts say it is one of the biggest collections in the world. But Carole does not want to sell them, and has placed half of the collection in the New York Historical Society. The other half is in a children’s museum in Rochester, New York.

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