What Is A Will Really For?

We all know what a will is, don’t we? Or do we? It may seem like an obvious thing, but when Macmillan Cancer Support carried out a survey and discovered that 98 percent of people couldn’t accurately describe what a will is actually for, it may be time to think again. Although most people understand that a will is about ensuring that your beneficiaries receive what you want them to receive, there are other factors, and this is what was missing from most explanations.

Those other factors include the fact that having a will means that you won’t die ‘intestate’, which makes things very difficult for your family members, and makes probate a much longer drawn out thing than it really should be. It also doesn’t take into account the fact that a will needs to be updated after a re-marriage, or a divorce. It is a little more complicated than some people imagine, but this should not mean that you shouldn’t write a will – if anything, it means that writing a will simplifies things after you have died.

What Is A Will Really For 300x199 What Is A Will Really For?

Macmillan’s survey also said that around 70 percent of people like to plan ahead, but that only 40 percent of the UK’s adult population had actually written their will. This is most likely due to the fact that people still find talking about – or even thinking about – death a taboo, or a frightening prospect, and therefore they put it off. Unfortunately, when writing a will is so important, and when there are many companies and people who are happy to help in such an endeavour, not writing a will causes far more problems than writing one would ever do. A short time of feeling uncomfortable thinking about your own mortality is far better than leaving confusion and bad feeling for your family after you pass away.

The misunderstandings that come with the idea of will writing include thinking that you have to be over a certain age (40 is the one that most cite) before you can write one. This is borne out with evidence that shows that 80 percent of 18-34 year olds don’t have a will compared to just 32 percent of those over 55. Another confusion is the cost of will writing. It is often assumed that will writing is a very expensive process, when in reality the cost of usually a lot less than people think.

But the problem comes when people think wills are solely about money. And those who have very little in savings or no assets therefore don’t think that a will is relevant to them, or their families. This is not the case, however. Wills are about more than who gets what. They can also set out what the deceased would like to have happen after their death, and this is especially important if children are involved.

 

Leave a Reply

Contact us

x

Call us for a quote, instant help or impartial advice on freephone
0800 612 6105 0800 calls are free - 0333 are local rate - Just click to Call



Or complete the form below
Name
Email
Tel
Message